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8/20/2014 9:13:57 AMANW002buyboxdiscountGet up to 10% OFF MOST ORDERS TODAY Use Code Savings at checkoutcserebatediscountbannerv2discountbannerv2secuhomepagemainhours Mon-Fri: 7 AM - 5 PM PSTlogomobilebannermobilebannersecurepopcouponseoblurbCool Down With A Misting FanHow Misting Fans WorkMisting fans are basically regular fans, but with the added element of water (these fans must be connected to a water source). Because the mist from these fans lingers in the air, the space around them can easily be kept up to 40 degrees cooler than the temperature of the surrounding environment, and you don't even need to walk directly in front of one of these fans to feel its cooling effect. The average misting fan operates using thermal dynamics and water evaporation to lower temperatures. Although other types of cooling appliances that use water evaporation do so by drawing in warm air through water soaked pads (instantly cooling it), the typical misting fan takes a slightly different approach.Tank V's Hose Misting FansAs far as the water source goes, some misting fans have a water tank that must be refilled and cleaned out on occasion in order to stay in proper operation. Misting fans with a refillable tank can be a good option for spaces not close to a water source or fans that need to stay portable. However, there are many models that conveniently connect directly to your garden hose for instant access to a water source. If you do happen to have more than one misting fan, you can use a hose splitter (available at most home improvement stores) so you can connect a hose to each appliance.Misting fans with water tanks do not need to connect to an external water source, but they do have a limited amount of time until they need to be refilled again. Obviously, the amount of water a tank can hold varies from model to model, but the average backyard misting fan can last three to seven hours before they need another water refill.Now, aside from the maintenance factor of the water tank misting fans, the other factor that sets the two types apart is the cost. Fans that connect to garden hoses tend to be a lot cheaper than their water tank counterparts, and this is largely due to the higher manufacturing costs of water tank systems. On the other hand, water tank misting fans are a lot more portable than those that connect to garden hoses, although both still need to be connected to an energy source for power.When And Where To Use Misting FansMisting fans are a great option during the summer months when temperatures are highest. To be more specific, the best time to run a misting fan out on your patio or deck is going to be between midday and the later afternoon-- the hottest hours of the day. As far as location goes, it's best that you keep a misting fan off to one side of your patio with plenty of space around it (especially if you have kids running around, safety should come first). Make sure it is not up against the side of your house or any other walls.Misting fans are built to be sturdy and will survive if left outside during a rainstorm, but that doesn't mean they should be left in the open day after day. If exposed to high humidity for extended periods of time, a misting fan can corrode. Fortunately, all you have to do is put the fan in your garage or shed when you're not using it. Allow time for the unit to dry out before packing it away for storage. This will help prevent mildew from forming. Most misting fans come with manuals that advise how best to take care of them and when to use them.trust50372232Contentweather-lessons.htmPage-Content-weather-lessons.htm99349/weather-lessons.htm26FreeAnswerUrl/weather-lessons.htm1System27FreeAnswerBrowser TitleHeat, Ice, Air & Water - A Teacher's Guide to Weather Lessons1Page28WysiwygContent<table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="700" align="center"><tbody><tr><td><h1>Heat, Ice, Air &amp; Water - A Teacher's Guide to Weather Lessons</h1><table style="width: 200px" border="0" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" align="right"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"><img src="http://cache.air-n-water.com/images/weather-lessons-b.jpg" alt="weatherlessons" align="right"/></td></tr></tbody></table><p>Teaching middle school students about weather can be a little difficult; they may not be interested in topics like rain,&nbsp; winter, heat, and extreme weather, or understand how weather directly affects their lives on a daily basis - besides what they are wearing each day. Fortunately, teachers who are working on their weather lesson plans can find many great resources on the Internet. There are many interactive and fun lessons that can certainly make the classes much more interesting for the students and help them to get excited about science and the weather. The following is a teacher's guide to fun and exciting weather lessons that can be incorporated into the classroom.</p><p><strong>Teaching about Rain</strong></p><ul><li><a href="http://www.ema.gov.au/www/ema/schools.nsf/Page/TeachLesson_PlansSevere_Storms" rel="nofollow">Severe Storms</a>: In this lesson plan, students would investigate how storms are formed and how to stay safe. </li><li><a href="http://eo.ucar.edu/webweather/tornact2.html" rel="nofollow">Thunderstorms &amp; Tornadoes</a>: Students would learn how to make convection currents in this lesson. </li><li><a href="http://www.windows2universe.org/teacher_resources/rain_edu.html" rel="nofollow">Make it Rain</a>: A great way to teach students about how rain is formed. </li><li><a href="http://www.srh.noaa.gov/jetstream/atmos/ll_rainman.htm" rel="nofollow">The Rain Man</a>: This lesson is a great way to demonstrate how precipitation works. </li><li><a href="http://www.reec.nsw.edu.au/k6/page/wa47.htm" rel="nofollow">Why Does it Rain?</a>: Explains why it rains with diagrams and quiz. </li><li><a href="http://alex.state.al.us/lesson_view.php?id=6574" rel="nofollow">Rain Lesson Plan</a>: The lesson plan shows why it rains and it can be adapted for middle school students. </li><li><a href="http://www.valdosta.edu/~drdaigle/topic.html" rel="nofollow">Where Does Rain Come From?</a>: A WebQuest which helps to answer the question. </li><li><a href="http://www.epa.gov/safewater/kids/flash/flash_watercycle.html" rel="nofollow">The Water Cycle</a>: An interactive lesson showing how the water cycle works. </li><li><a href="http://www.cotf.edu/ete/modules/msese/earthsysflr/water.html" rel="nofollow">Water on Earth</a>: A diagram with description of the water cycle process. </li><li><a href="http://mshistory.k12.ms.us/articles/230/index.php?s=lesson-plans&amp;id=232" rel="nofollow">Flood of 1927</a>: The lesson plan is based on the Flood of 1927 in Greenville, Mississippi. </li></ul><p><strong>Teaching about Winter Weather</strong></p><ul><li><a href="http://nsidc.org/snow/index.html" rel="nofollow">All about Snow</a>: The National Snow and Ice Data Center provides comprehensive information about snow. </li><li><a href="http://astro.uchicago.edu/cara/southpole.edu/flaky.html" rel="nofollow">Don't Be Too Flaky</a>: Students would measure the relative densities of ice, water, and snow in this experiment. </li><li><a href="http://www.its.caltech.edu/~atomic/snowcrystals/primer/primer.htm">Snowflake Primer</a>: Excellent place to learn about snowflakes and snow crystals. </li><li><a href="http://dnr.wi.gov/org/caer/ce/eek/nature/snow.htm" rel="nofollow">Let it Snow</a>: Students can come here to read about how snow is formed. </li><li><a href="http://mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov/preview_lesson.php?&amp;passid=96" rel="nofollow">Cold, Clouds, &amp; Snowflakes</a>: In this lesson plan, students will learn about the relationship between temperature of clouds, amount of water vapor, cloud temperature, and snowflake shapes. </li><li><a href="http://www2.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF8/868.html" rel="nofollow">A Snowflake</a>: Come here to follow the life story of a snowflake. </li></ul><p><strong>Teaching about Heat</strong></p><ul><li><a href="http://www.reachoutmichigan.org/funexperiments/agesubject/lessons/caps/htransfer.html" rel="nofollow">Heat Transfer</a>: In this lesson, students would learn how heat transfer affects the weather. </li><li><a href="http://www.weather.gov/om/heat/index.shtml" rel="nofollow">Heat A Major Killer</a>: The NOAA provides comprehensive information on heat and weather. </li><li><a href="http://www.atmos.washington.edu/2009Q1/111/ATMS111%20Presentations/Folder%201/CampbellS.pdf" rel="nofollow">2003 Heat Wave</a>: The study focuses on the heat wave which occurred in Europe in 2003. </li><li><a href="http://www.isse.ucar.edu/heat/index.html" rel="nofollow">Heat Wave Awareness Project</a>: A great resource center on heat wave. </li><li><a href="http://www.co.pasquotank.nc.us/departments/911/webpage/heatwaves.htm" rel="nofollow">Heat Waves</a>: Explains how heat waves are formed. </li><li><a href="http://www.qrg.northwestern.edu/projects/vss/docs/thermal/1-how-does-heat-move.html" rel="nofollow">Heat Movement</a>: A scientific enquiry into how heat moves. </li><li><a href="http://www-istp.gsfc.nasa.gov/stargaze/Sun1lite.htm" rel="nofollow">Sunlight &amp; the Earth</a>: The module explores the relationship between the sun and the earth with lesson plan, Q&amp;A, glossary, and more. </li><li><a href="http://www.atmos.illinois.edu/earths_atmosphere/heat_transfer.html" rel="nofollow">Sun &amp; Earth</a>: Provides information on heat transfer. </li><li><a href="http://www.ace.mmu.ac.uk/kids/globalwarming.html" rel="nofollow">Greenhouse Effect</a>: The lesson explains how the greenhouse effect affects global warming. </li><li><a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A1156826" rel="nofollow">Surviving Hot Weather</a>: Describes how people can survive hot weather. </li></ul><p><strong>Teaching about Extreme Weather</strong></p><ul><li><a href="http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/15/gk2/tornadowhat.html" rel="nofollow">What is a Tornado?</a>: In this lesson plan, students learn about how tornadoes are formed. </li><li><a href="http://www.field-trips.org/sci/tornado/index.htm" rel="nofollow">Tornado Field Trip</a>: This is a good way to teach students all about tornadoes. </li><li><a href="http://uncw.edu/smec/gk_fellows/Documents/TornadoinaBottle.pdf" rel="nofollow">Tornado in a Bottle</a>: In this simple experiment, students would be able to visualize a tornado. </li><li><a href="http://ww2010.atmos.uiuc.edu/(Gh)/guides/mtr/hurr/home.rxml" rel="nofollow">Hurricanes</a>: The online meteorology guide by the University of Illinois. </li><li><a href="http://www.cotf.edu/ete/modules/sevweath/sevweath.html" rel="nofollow">Severe Weather</a>: Interactive program to educate students about hurricanes. </li><li><a href="http://archive.ncsa.illinois.edu/Cyberia/DVE/FusionDVE/html/hurricane_lesson_plan.html" rel="nofollow">Tracking a Hurricane</a>: This interesting lesson plan teaches students to use satellite imagery to track hurricanes. </li><li><a href="http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/tcfaq/tcfaqHED.html" rel="nofollow">FAQs</a>: Provides answers to frequently asked questions about hurricanes. </li><li><a href="http://earthsci.org/flood/j_flood04/cyclone/cyclone.html" rel="nofollow">Tropical Cyclones</a>: Covers cyclone formation, cyclone stages, cyclone movement, and major areas affected by cyclones. </li><li><a href="http://library.thinkquest.org/10136/cyclones/cycltq.htm" rel="nofollow">Cyclones</a>: An online lesson with pictures and diagrams. </li><li><a href="http://www.ema.gov.au/www/ema/schools.nsf/Page/TeachLesson_PlansCyclones" rel="nofollow">Lesson Plans</a>: Some lesson plans to teach students about cyclones. </li><li><a href="http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/dust-bowl-days" rel="nofollow">Dust Bowl Days</a>: The lesson plan is centered on the Dust Bowl of the 1930s. </li><li><a href="http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/dust-bowl-days">1930's Dust Bowl</a>: A great explanation of the dust bowl with pictures. </li><li><a href="http://www.weru.ksu.edu/new_weru/multimedia/dustbowl/dustbowlpics.html" rel="nofollow">The Dust Bowl</a>: Good collection of dust bowl pictures with commentaries. </li></ul></td></tr></tbody></table>1Page2729WysiwygFooter<div align="center"><table border="0" width="700"><tbody><tr><td><h2>Recommended Pages: </h2></td></td /></tr><tr><td><table border="1" cellspacing="0" width="700" cellpading="0"><tbody><tr><td><table><tbody></tbody></table><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="700" align="center"><tbody><tr><th>Patio&nbsp;Heaters </th><th>Ice Makers</th><th>Air Conditioners</th></tr><tr><td><ul><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/portable-air-conditioners.htm">Portable air conditioner unit</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/personal-air-coolers.htm">Air cooler</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/wine-cooler-cabinets.htm">Wine cabinets </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/fan_ceiling.html">Ceiling fans</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/ice-maker.htm">Ice making machines</a> </li></ul></td><td><ul><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/charcoal-grills.htm">Charcoal grill</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/fan_window.html">Window fan</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/portable-air-conditioners.htm">Portable air conditioner</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/freestanding-wine-coolers.htm">Freestanding wine cellar </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/personal-air-coolers.htm">Swamp cooler</a> </li></ul></td><td><ul><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/bbq-grills.htm">BBQ grill</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/wine-cellar.htm">Wine coolers </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/patio-furniture.htm">Patio furniture</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/patio-furniture.htm">Teak outdoor furniture</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/portable-air-conditioners.htm">Portable room air conditioner</a> </li></ul></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td /></tr /></table /></div>1Page29MultiChoiceDropDownTemplate1171System1449MultiChoiceDropDownSidebar741System281FreeAnswerMeta Keywordsweather lessons, storms, thunderstorms, rain, water cycle, extreme weather, hurricanes1Page282FreeAnswerMeta DescriptionWant to know more about weather? Here is a great teacher's guide to fun and exciting weather lessons that can be incorporated into the classroom.1Page106805weatherlessonsImage-weather-lessons.htm-weatherlessons030/images/weather-lessons-b.jpg/images/weather-lessons-b-s.jpg/images/weather-lessons-b-l.jpg/images/weather-lessons-b-m.jpg/images/weather-lessons-b.jpg/images/weather-lessons-b-c.jpg

Heat, Ice, Air & Water - A Teacher's Guide to Weather Lessons

weatherlessons

Teaching middle school students about weather can be a little difficult; they may not be interested in topics like rain,  winter, heat, and extreme weather, or understand how weather directly affects their lives on a daily basis - besides what they are wearing each day. Fortunately, teachers who are working on their weather lesson plans can find many great resources on the Internet. There are many interactive and fun lessons that can certainly make the classes much more interesting for the students and help them to get excited about science and the weather. The following is a teacher's guide to fun and exciting weather lessons that can be incorporated into the classroom.

Teaching about Rain

  • Severe Storms: In this lesson plan, students would investigate how storms are formed and how to stay safe.
  • Thunderstorms & Tornadoes: Students would learn how to make convection currents in this lesson.
  • Make it Rain: A great way to teach students about how rain is formed.
  • The Rain Man: This lesson is a great way to demonstrate how precipitation works.
  • Why Does it Rain?: Explains why it rains with diagrams and quiz.
  • Rain Lesson Plan: The lesson plan shows why it rains and it can be adapted for middle school students.
  • Where Does Rain Come From?: A WebQuest which helps to answer the question.
  • The Water Cycle: An interactive lesson showing how the water cycle works.
  • Water on Earth: A diagram with description of the water cycle process.
  • Flood of 1927: The lesson plan is based on the Flood of 1927 in Greenville, Mississippi.

Teaching about Winter Weather

  • All about Snow: The National Snow and Ice Data Center provides comprehensive information about snow.
  • Don't Be Too Flaky: Students would measure the relative densities of ice, water, and snow in this experiment.
  • Snowflake Primer: Excellent place to learn about snowflakes and snow crystals.
  • Let it Snow: Students can come here to read about how snow is formed.
  • Cold, Clouds, & Snowflakes: In this lesson plan, students will learn about the relationship between temperature of clouds, amount of water vapor, cloud temperature, and snowflake shapes.
  • A Snowflake: Come here to follow the life story of a snowflake.

Teaching about Heat

Teaching about Extreme Weather

  • What is a Tornado?: In this lesson plan, students learn about how tornadoes are formed.
  • Tornado Field Trip: This is a good way to teach students all about tornadoes.
  • Tornado in a Bottle: In this simple experiment, students would be able to visualize a tornado.
  • Hurricanes: The online meteorology guide by the University of Illinois.
  • Severe Weather: Interactive program to educate students about hurricanes.
  • Tracking a Hurricane: This interesting lesson plan teaches students to use satellite imagery to track hurricanes.
  • FAQs: Provides answers to frequently asked questions about hurricanes.
  • Tropical Cyclones: Covers cyclone formation, cyclone stages, cyclone movement, and major areas affected by cyclones.
  • Cyclones: An online lesson with pictures and diagrams.
  • Lesson Plans: Some lesson plans to teach students about cyclones.
  • Dust Bowl Days: The lesson plan is centered on the Dust Bowl of the 1930s.
  • 1930's Dust Bowl: A great explanation of the dust bowl with pictures.
  • The Dust Bowl: Good collection of dust bowl pictures with commentaries.

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