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8/1/2014 10:30:07 PMANW004buyboxdiscountGet up to 10% OFF MOST ORDERS TODAY Use Code Happy at checkoutcserebatediscountbannerv2discountbannerv2secuhomepagemainhours Mon-Fri: 7 AM - 5 PM PSTlogomobilebannermobilebannersecurepopcouponseoblurbThe 8 Best Places To Use Your Portable Air ConditionerThe GarageGarages and workshops can be difficult areas to cool, especially since these spaces are not typically insulated. This causes the air to warm very quickly. But if you plan to spend a lot of time in your garage, then you're going to need a cooling option. Since an electric fan would simply circulate the warm air, they typically won't be able to lower the air temperature enough to make a difference. A portable air conditioner, however, can lower the temperature substantially without taking up much more space than a fan would. It's important to buy a portable air conditioner with a little more power because of the lack of insulation.The BedroomAs sleeping is such a important part of our lives, complete comfort is absolutely essential for your bedroom. While some standard air conditioning units can be loud and obnoxious while running, many portable air conditioners can run much quieter. In particular, Sharp has a line specifically designed to run quietly. Their patented "Library Quiet" technology ensures that the portable AC will not keep you up at night or force you to choose between comfort and noise ever again.Your Basement Basements typically are cooler than other areas of your home, but still suffer from warm, humid air over the summer months. Since basements typically do not have the window space available that a window air conditioner would require, nor the access to most central air systems, a portable air conditioner is a great alternative. Additionally, most portable air conditioners can also help to dehumidify the air, which only adds to their usability in the basement. Portable AC units are also small and mobile, so they'll fit almost anywhere in your basement.The OfficeIt's difficult to get anything done when you're hot and uncomfortable at work. Whether you're looking to cool your entire business or just your small corner office, a portable air conditioner will have you covered. Due to their mobility, portable air conditioners are great for office use, since you can move it from room to room to spot cool the areas that need it most. They're also compact enough to fit in any corner and can run quietly, ensuring they don't disturb anyone else in the office.Your Dorm RoomDorm rooms can get pretty hot, especially with all these electronics humming away. Unfortunately, many dorms do not have central air, and a window unit is either not allowed or just not feasible given your available space. Luckily, a portable air conditioner is smaller and doesn't require permanent installation. Venting is also simple and does not require as much space as a window unit. Above all, portable air conditioners are easy to move from room to room so it can go wherever the party is.The Living Room Once again, due to their size, cooling power and lack of installation requirements, portable air conditioners are perfect for the living room in your home. In addition to cooling the room, many different portable ACs can also act as an air purifier, which will help keep the air in your living room clean and free from dust and bacteria. Not only is it a great fit for your home, but a portable air conditioner can save you space and money you'd otherwise spend on other home appliances. A Server Room Server rooms can get very hot, thanks in part to the large number of computer parts working within a confined space. The heat generated from all the equipment can often raise the temperature of the room well beyond the recommended limits for the computer servers, which can lead to critical hardware and data problems. Not to mention that computer equipment ages quicker when hot. Some portable air conditioners are specially designed to work in server rooms, and also have the ability to act as a dehumidifier, which can further help keep your computer equipment safe.Your Studio Apartment Some might say that portable air conditioners were designed with studio apartments in mind. Thanks to their size and the lack of installation required, these cooling units are perfect for apartment living. These units are especially useful in buildings where window units are not allowed, or when there's simply not enough available space for one. If you have a studio, typically your space is at a premium, so the compact size of a portable AC is perfect for your climate control needs.trust734325103ContentWBP Tips on Heat SafetyPage-Content-WBP-Tips-on-Heat-Safety142982/tips-on-heat-safety.htm26FreeAnswerUrl/tips-on-heat-safety.htm1System27FreeAnswerBrowser TitleChill Out! - Tips on Heat Safety1Page28WysiwygContent<div align="center"><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="700"><tbody><tr><td><h1>Chill Out! - Tips on Heat Safety</h1><p>Extreme heat may be defined as a situation where a region's temperature rises at least 10' above what is considered the normal high temperature.&nbsp;The condition is dangerous and poses serious health consequences for many.&nbsp;Extreme heat is associated with heat stroke and heat exhaustion, both of which can lead to hyperthermia.&nbsp;Hyperthermia is a medical condition, which involves the body heating faster than it can cool off.&nbsp;Often attributed to extreme heat, hyperthermia requires immediate medical attention or it can prove fateful.</p><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="466"><b>Definition</b> <p>Sometimes referred to as a heat wave, extreme heat often occurs during summer and includes periods of unusually high temperatures that last for an indefinite length of time.&nbsp;A heat wave differs from an unusually hot summer day, as a heat wave occurs consecutively.&nbsp;High humidity may or may not accompany a heat wave.&nbsp;During times of extreme heat, citizens tend to use their air conditioners more frequently, which may result in widespread power outages.&nbsp;The high temperatures may scorch fields and cause significant crop loss.&nbsp;Hyperthermia is the leading cause of death during times of extreme heat.&nbsp;Other effects of extreme heat include rash, cramps, exhaustion, and heat stroke.&nbsp;There are several people that are highly susceptible to the effects of extreme heat and all precautions must be taken to prevent them from succumbing to the ill-effects associated with high or extreme heat.&nbsp;</p></td><td><p style="text-align: center"><img src="http://cache.air-n-water.com/images/thermometer-b.jpg" alt="thermostat b"/></p></td></tr></tbody></table><p><b>Safety Precautions when Outside</b></p><p>Precaution is the best method to prevent complications from extreme heat.&nbsp;There are certain situations where a person becomes more vulnerable to the effects of extreme heat than another.&nbsp;Those with compromised immune systems, underlying medical conditions, the elderly, and infants are extremely vulnerable to extreme heat.&nbsp;By taking precautions, you can do everything within your power to prevent heat exhaustion, heat stroke, and hyperthermia.</p><ul><li>Find an air-conditioned spot and stay there.&nbsp;Do not travel outdoors during times of extreme heat, but rather remain indoors, close to your cooling source.&nbsp; </li><li>Make certain to drink plenty of liquids, such as water or an electrolyte replacement drink.&nbsp;Stay away from sugar laden, alcohol rich, or caffeinated beverages as these contribute to dehydration.&nbsp; </li><li>Choose an air-conditioned location rather than use a fan.&nbsp;Fans are often ineffective against the dangers of hyperthermia. </li><li>Take cold showers or baths for a fast way to cool down. </li><li>Avoid overly cold drinks as they may cause stomach cramping. </li><li>Choose thin, lightweight clothing. </li><li>Never leave someone in a car during times of extreme heat. </li><li>Limit all outdoor activities and avoid going outside if possible. </li><li>If you must go outside drink plenty of water and do not wait until you are thirsty. </li><li>Limit activities and rest in a cool room.</li></ul><p><b>Work Safety</b></p><p>Preventing heat related illnesses is not something reserved solely for citizens; employers must take safety measures as well.&nbsp;Education is key and employers should speak to their employees regarding heat stroke and other illnesses so they are equipped to prevent them.&nbsp;Employees must make certain they provide workers with water and an area where overheated workers may cool down.&nbsp;It is recommended that workers drink approximately one pint of water per hour during times of extreme heat.&nbsp;Employers must make certain that workers are dressed appropriately and wearing lightweight clothing.</p><p><b>Monitoring Those at High Risk</b></p><p>Those who are high risk of succumbing to health related illness must be carefully monitored for signs of heat related illness.&nbsp;High-risk individuals include the elderly, those with heart conditions, people on medications, the overweight or obese, and young infants, and children.&nbsp;The elderly have a harder time adjusting to high temperatures and they should remain indoors, near an air conditioner.&nbsp;Make certain that you regularly check on high risk individuals and seek medical help immediately in times of an emergency.</p><p><b>Health Emergencies</b></p><p>Knowing the signs and symptoms of health related injuries will help alert you to signs of an emergency.&nbsp;Heat exhaustion may include symptoms such as a person feeling nauseous, sweating profusely, feeling muscle cramps and overwhelming tiredness and fatigue, sudden weakness or fainting.&nbsp;Anyone experiencing heat exhaustion must be moved to a cold area immediately.&nbsp;It may be necessary to remove clothing to help the person cool down.&nbsp;Seek medical attention if the person does not cool down or begin to feel better.</p><p>Heat stroke is more serious and can prove fatal.&nbsp;With heat stroke, a person may develop hot, red skin that is dry to the touch.&nbsp;The temperature is rising faster than the body is cooling off and sweating stops.&nbsp;A person may fee nauseous, have a racing pulse, become dizzy and even lose consciousness.&nbsp;Their skin color might change to a grayish tone.&nbsp;If someone is experiencing heat stroke call 911 immediately.&nbsp;Place the person in a tub of cool water and stay with them to make sure they do not lose consciousness.&nbsp;The person must cool down as quickly as possible.&nbsp;Do not wait for symptoms of heat stroke to subside on their own but rather seek medical attention immediately.</p><ul><li><a href="http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/" rel="nofollow">CDC: Extreme Heat: </a>&nbsp;&nbsp;A guide from the Centers for Disease Control regarding extreme heat.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://www.nws.noaa.gov/os/heat/index.shtml" rel="nofollow">Heat:&nbsp;A Major Killer: </a>&nbsp;NOAA discuses heat hazards and safety&nbsp;&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://www.ready.gov/heat/" rel="nofollow">Extreme Heat: </a>&nbsp;Ready.gov examines extreme heat and offers advice for citizens.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://www.osha.gov/Publications/osha3154.pdf" rel="nofollow">Protecting Workers from Heat Stress: </a>&nbsp;&nbsp;PDF guide from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration regarding heat stress and the workplace.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://eden.lsu.edu/Topics/Hazards/Heat/Pages/default.aspx" rel="nofollow">Heat Wave-Extreme Heat: </a>&nbsp;Resources for dealing with extreme heat provided through the Extension Disaster Education Network (EDEN).&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://www.epa.gov/naturalevents/extremeheat.html" rel="nofollow">Extreme Heat: </a>&nbsp;The Environmental Protection Agency offers safety and preparation tips for those in extreme temperatures.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://sciencepolicy.colorado.edu/socasp/weather1/adams.html" rel="nofollow">Impacts of Temperature Extremes: </a>&nbsp;The Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere at Colorado State University discusses the health impacts of extreme heat.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://disaster.ifas.ufl.edu/PDFS/CHAP16/D16-04.PDF" rel="nofollow">Extreme Heat and Drought: </a>&nbsp;PDF Fact sheet by the University of Florida that discusses steps to take before and after extreme heat exposure.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="https://www.pointpark.edu/About/AdminDepts/PublicSafety/EmergencyProcedures/ExtremeHeat" rel="nofollow">What to do in Case of Extreme Heat: </a>&nbsp;Guide from Point Park University regarding steps to take during exposure to extreme heat.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://texashelp.tamu.edu/004-natural/heat-waves.php" rel="nofollow">Heat Waves: </a>&nbsp;The Texas Extension Disaster Education Network through Texas A&amp;M Systems discusses heat waves and steps to take when exposed to extreme or excessive heat and high humidity.&nbsp;&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://www.redcross.org/portal/site/en/menuitem.86f46a12f382290517a8f210b80f78a0/?vgnextoid=8cc6a5f0f013b110VgnVCM10000089f0870aRCRD&amp;vgnextfmt=default">Heat Wave Safety Checklist: </a>&nbsp;The American Red Cross explains the difference between terms used to describe a heat wave.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://gohsep.la.gov/factsheets/factsaboutextremeheat.htm" rel="nofollow">Facts about Extreme Heat: </a>&nbsp;Louisiana Office of Emergency Preparedness defines extreme heat and provides information for citizens and communities.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://www.washington.edu/emergency/hazards/heat" rel="nofollow">What to Do in Case of Extreme Heat: </a>&nbsp;University of Washington discusses steps to take when exposed to temperatures at least 10 degrees above normal.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://www.sc.edu/carolinaalert/procedures_heat.shtml" rel="nofollow">Emergency Procedures: </a>&nbsp;Extreme Heat:&nbsp;Guidelines from the University of South Carolina regarding extreme heat.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://www.ag.purdue.edu/extension/eden/Pages/heat.aspx" rel="nofollow">Extreme Heat: </a>&nbsp;Resources and tips from the Purdue Extension regarding extreme heat.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/heatillness.html" rel="nofollow">Heat Illness: </a>&nbsp;Extreme heat and sunstroke identified and addressed by Medline Plus.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://www.bcm.edu/news/item.cfm?newsID=4362" rel="nofollow">Extreme Heat Raises Concerns about Lunchbox Food Safety: </a>&nbsp;The Baylor College of Medicine looks at the impact of extreme heat on lunchbox food.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://today.ttu.edu/2008/07/extreme-heat-energy-shortages-predicted-for-21st-century/" rel="nofollow">Extreme Heat, Energy Shortage Predicted for 21<sup>st</sup> Century: </a>&nbsp;Texas Tech Today looks at the impact of extreme heat.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://www.westboylston-ma.gov/Pages/WBoylstonMA_Healthy/heatstroke" rel="nofollow">Heat Stroke: </a>&nbsp;West Boylston, Massachusetts looks at those who are most susceptible to heat stroke.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://www.eugene-or.gov/healthierathome/p389-391%20Heat%20Exhaustion%20&amp;%20Heat%20Stroke.htm" rel="nofollow">Heat Exhaustion and Heat Stroke: </a>&nbsp;Eugene, Oregon explains the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat stroke.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://www.fs.fed.us/safety/health/heat.shtml" rel="nofollow">Safety: Heat Exhaustion/Heat Stroke: </a>&nbsp;The U.S. Forest Service looks at signs, symptoms, and ways to prevent heat exhaustion and heat stroke.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://msdh.ms.gov/msdhsite/_static/43,3942,98,261.html" rel="nofollow">Heat Exhaustion and Heat Stroke:</a>&nbsp;Warning signs of heat exhaustion and heat stroke presented by the Mississippi State Department of Health.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://www.adph.org/injuryprevention/index.asp?id=4458" rel="nofollow">Injury Prevention: Heat Related Illnesses: </a>&nbsp;The Alabama Department of Public Health looks at heat related illnesses and steps t take to prevent illnesses.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://www.arfamilies.org/health_nutrition/aging/extreme_heat.pdf" rel="nofollow">Extreme Heat and Aging: </a>&nbsp;PDF guide from the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture that looks at hyperthermia.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://www.odh.ohio.gov/features/odhfeatures/heatsafety.aspx" rel="nofollow">Heat Safety:</a> Resources from the Ohio Department of Health regarding heat exhaustion.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://www.houstontx.gov/health/NewsReleases/precautions.htm" rel="nofollow">Precautions can prevent heat related illness:</a> The City of Houston looks at heat related illnesses and prevention.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://mcaas.montcopa.org/mcaas/cwp/view.asp?a=1505&amp;q=58773" rel="nofollow">Tips for Preventing Heat-Related Illness</a>:&nbsp;Tips from Montgomery County, Pennsylvania regarding heat related illness and the elderly.&nbsp; </li><li><a href="http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/healthy_living/9279/tips_for_preventing_heat-related_illness/558323" rel="nofollow">Tips for Preventing Heat-Related Illness: </a>&nbsp;Tips for preventing hyperthermia from the Pennsylvania Department of Health.&nbsp;</li></ul></td></tr></tbody></table></div>1Page2729WysiwygFooter<div align="center"><table border="0" width="700"><tbody><tr><td><h2>Recommended Pages: </h2></td></td /></tr><tr><td><table border="1" cellspacing="0" width="700" cellpading="0"><tbody><tr><td><table><tbody></tbody></table><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="700" align="center"><tbody><tr><th>Portable Air Coolers</th><th>Patio Furniture</th><th>Ice Makers</th></tr><tr><td><ul><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/patio-furniture.htm">Wood outdoor furniture</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/fan_ceiling.html">Ceiling fans</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/water-dispensers.htm">5 gallon water dispenser </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/smoker-grills.htm">Smoker grills</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/portable-air-conditioners.htm">Portable air conditioners</a> </li></ul></td><td><ul><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/portable-air-conditioners.htm">Portable air conditioner units</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/portable-air-conditioners.htm">Quietest portable air conditioner</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/dehumidifiers.htm">Dehumidifiers </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/fan_window.html">Window fans</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/humidifiers.htm">Humidifiers </a></li></ul></td><td><ul><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/water-dispensers.htm">Water cooler </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/newair-ice-makers.htm">Newair ice maker</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/patio-furniture-chairs.htm">Patio chairs</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/electric-grills.htm">Electric BBQ grill</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/ac-recommended.html">Best portable air conditioner</a> </li></ul></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td /></tr /></table /></div>1Page29MultiChoiceDropDownTemplate1171System1449MultiChoiceDropDownSidebar-11System281FreeAnswerMeta Keywordsheat safety, heat safety tips, heatstroke, heat stroke, heat wave, heatwave1Page282FreeAnswerMeta DescriptionAvoid hyperthermia, a medical condition that makes the body heat faster than it can cool off. Read our tips on how to stay cool in excessive heat here!1Page142984thermostat bImage-thermostat-b011/images/thermometer-b.jpg/images/thermometer-b-s.jpg/images/thermometer-b-l.jpg/images/thermometer-b-m.jpg/images/thermometer-b.jpg/images/thermometer-b-c.jpg35Alt TextThermometer1FreeAnswer142984thermostat bImage-thermostat-b030/images/thermometer-b.jpg/images/thermometer-b-s.jpg/images/thermometer-b-l.jpg/images/thermometer-b-m.jpg/images/thermometer-b.jpg/images/thermometer-b-c.jpg

Chill Out! - Tips on Heat Safety

Extreme heat may be defined as a situation where a region's temperature rises at least 10' above what is considered the normal high temperature. The condition is dangerous and poses serious health consequences for many. Extreme heat is associated with heat stroke and heat exhaustion, both of which can lead to hyperthermia. Hyperthermia is a medical condition, which involves the body heating faster than it can cool off. Often attributed to extreme heat, hyperthermia requires immediate medical attention or it can prove fateful.

Definition

Sometimes referred to as a heat wave, extreme heat often occurs during summer and includes periods of unusually high temperatures that last for an indefinite length of time. A heat wave differs from an unusually hot summer day, as a heat wave occurs consecutively. High humidity may or may not accompany a heat wave. During times of extreme heat, citizens tend to use their air conditioners more frequently, which may result in widespread power outages. The high temperatures may scorch fields and cause significant crop loss. Hyperthermia is the leading cause of death during times of extreme heat. Other effects of extreme heat include rash, cramps, exhaustion, and heat stroke. There are several people that are highly susceptible to the effects of extreme heat and all precautions must be taken to prevent them from succumbing to the ill-effects associated with high or extreme heat. 

thermostat b

Safety Precautions when Outside

Precaution is the best method to prevent complications from extreme heat. There are certain situations where a person becomes more vulnerable to the effects of extreme heat than another. Those with compromised immune systems, underlying medical conditions, the elderly, and infants are extremely vulnerable to extreme heat. By taking precautions, you can do everything within your power to prevent heat exhaustion, heat stroke, and hyperthermia.

  • Find an air-conditioned spot and stay there. Do not travel outdoors during times of extreme heat, but rather remain indoors, close to your cooling source. 
  • Make certain to drink plenty of liquids, such as water or an electrolyte replacement drink. Stay away from sugar laden, alcohol rich, or caffeinated beverages as these contribute to dehydration. 
  • Choose an air-conditioned location rather than use a fan. Fans are often ineffective against the dangers of hyperthermia.
  • Take cold showers or baths for a fast way to cool down.
  • Avoid overly cold drinks as they may cause stomach cramping.
  • Choose thin, lightweight clothing.
  • Never leave someone in a car during times of extreme heat.
  • Limit all outdoor activities and avoid going outside if possible.
  • If you must go outside drink plenty of water and do not wait until you are thirsty.
  • Limit activities and rest in a cool room.

Work Safety

Preventing heat related illnesses is not something reserved solely for citizens; employers must take safety measures as well. Education is key and employers should speak to their employees regarding heat stroke and other illnesses so they are equipped to prevent them. Employees must make certain they provide workers with water and an area where overheated workers may cool down. It is recommended that workers drink approximately one pint of water per hour during times of extreme heat. Employers must make certain that workers are dressed appropriately and wearing lightweight clothing.

Monitoring Those at High Risk

Those who are high risk of succumbing to health related illness must be carefully monitored for signs of heat related illness. High-risk individuals include the elderly, those with heart conditions, people on medications, the overweight or obese, and young infants, and children. The elderly have a harder time adjusting to high temperatures and they should remain indoors, near an air conditioner. Make certain that you regularly check on high risk individuals and seek medical help immediately in times of an emergency.

Health Emergencies

Knowing the signs and symptoms of health related injuries will help alert you to signs of an emergency. Heat exhaustion may include symptoms such as a person feeling nauseous, sweating profusely, feeling muscle cramps and overwhelming tiredness and fatigue, sudden weakness or fainting. Anyone experiencing heat exhaustion must be moved to a cold area immediately. It may be necessary to remove clothing to help the person cool down. Seek medical attention if the person does not cool down or begin to feel better.

Heat stroke is more serious and can prove fatal. With heat stroke, a person may develop hot, red skin that is dry to the touch. The temperature is rising faster than the body is cooling off and sweating stops. A person may fee nauseous, have a racing pulse, become dizzy and even lose consciousness. Their skin color might change to a grayish tone. If someone is experiencing heat stroke call 911 immediately. Place the person in a tub of cool water and stay with them to make sure they do not lose consciousness. The person must cool down as quickly as possible. Do not wait for symptoms of heat stroke to subside on their own but rather seek medical attention immediately.

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