Hot Water Dispenser vs. Electric Kettle

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The Good The Bad The Bottom Line
Hot Water Dispenser vs. Electric Kettle

NewAir WAT40B Hot & Cold Water Dispenser

Provides Hot Water on Demand. Stainless Steel Water Tanks Costs More Than a Kettle Provides Hot Water Without Any Waiting
Hot Water Dispenser vs. Electric Kettle

Ovente KG83B Electric Tea Kettle

Large Water Capacity. More Efficient Than Stovetop Kettles Heat Can Warp Its Components An Attractive & Powerful Electric Kettle
Hot Water Dispenser vs. Electric Kettle

Proctor Silex K2070yA Electric Kettle

Boils Water in 4-7 Minutes. Detachable Power Cord Water Has a Plastic Taste A Fast Way to Boil Water

America brews hot coffee and tea in staggering amounts – 563.75 million gallons every year (23.75 million gallons of coffee, 540 million gallons of tea). That doesn’t just take a lot of tea leaves and coffee beans. It takes a lot of hot water as well. It may be why so many Americans are turning to alternatives to the traditional teapot, such as an electric kettle or hot water dispenser. These are two helpful kitchen appliances that let you make coffee, tea, or cocoa in a hurry; even instant noodles, if you’re hungry. To give you a better idea of the advantages they offer, we compared two of the most popular electric kettles – the Ovente KG83B Electric Tea Kettle and the Proctor Silex K2070yA Electric Kettle – with a hot water dispenser. There are a lot on the market, so we chose one of our favorites – the NewAir WAT40B Hot & Cold Water Dispenser – because its features represent the benefits dispensers provide.

Criteria

We evaluated each product using four factors.

  1. Heating Power. What temperature could it heat the water to? How long did it take?
  2. Water Capacity. How much water could it hold?
  3. Construction. What is it made from?
  4. Safety Features. How safe is it to use?

Heating Power

NewAir WAT40B Hot & Cold Water Dispenser
Hot Water Dispenser vs. Electric KettleLike most water dispensers, the NewAir WAT40B Hot & Cold Water Dispenser has two water reservoirs: one for hot water and one for cold water. The cold water reservoir is connected to a compressor, which chills water the same way your refrigerator would. The hot water reservoir is connected to an electric heating coil that draws electricity from your electrical system when you plug in the dispenser. Because the water is stored in a sealed tank, the dispenser can’t heat it all the way up to boiling point or the pressure might cause it to rupture, but it does get close: 185-198°F. This is good news if you’re a coffee lover. The best coffee is made with water that is just below boiling (212°F) – hot enough to extract the flavor from the coffee grounds, but not enough to burn them. The bad news is that hot water dispensers like the WAT40B aren’t as fast as electric kettles. They take about 10 minutes to reach their minimum temperature.

Ovente KG83B Electric Tea Kettle
The Ovente KG83B Electric Tea Kettle boils water using a 1100 watt, stainless-steel heating element in the bottom of the kettle. Because the heating element is insulated, more of the heat is directed into the water than it would be on a stove top, making the Ovente KG83B 85 percent more efficient than an ordinary tea kettle. It can boil a full pot of water in 10 minutes and one cup of water in as little as 4 minutes. Maximum temperature is 212°F, the boiling point of water. The kettle has an extra feature – a set of blue, LED lights around the base that light up while the kettle’s on.

Proctor Silex K2070yA Electric Kettle
Like Ovente, the Proctor Silex K2070yA Electric Kettle has a steel heating element in the base. It’s not quite as powerful – only 1000 watts – but takes only 5 minutes to bring a pot of water to a full boil. Smaller amounts, 2 cups or less, can be boiled in less than a minute.

Water Capacity

Hot Water Dispenser vs. Electric Kettle
NewAir WAT40B Hot & Cold Water Dispenser

The NewAir WAT40B Hot & Cold Water Dispenser can hold a full liter of hot water, which is a little more than a quart of water, similar to most water dispensers. The reservoir automatically refills with whenever hot water is dispensed and will never run completely out until the water bottle is entirely empty. (The WAT40B is designed for use with 5-gallon water bottles.) The water is heated automatically as it pours into the reservoir, so as long as you change the water bottle when it runs dry, you’ll always have plenty of hot water on hand.

Ovente KG83B Electric Tea Kettle
The Ovente KG83B Electric Tea Kettle can hold 1.5 liters (approximately 1.6 quarts) of water, but it requires a minimum of 1 cup of water in order to work, otherwise you risk damaging the unit.

Proctor Silex K2070yA Electric Kettle
The Proctor Silex K2070yA Electric Kettle holds one liter of water. The minimum required for boiling is 1-2 cups. The minimum and maximum water levels are clearly marked on the inside of the pot. To help you keep track of the water levels, the Proctor K2070yA has two windows on either side of the pot that let you see how much is inside.

Construction

Hot Water Dispenser vs. Electric KettleNewAir WAT40B Hot & Cold Water Dispenser
The NewAir WAT40B Hot & Cold Water Dispenser is made from plastic that is 100 percent BPA-free. BPA (short for bisphenol A) is an industrial chemical that is used to manufacture plastic. It acts as a stiffening agent, strengthening the plastic so it can support more weight using less material. Unfortunately, it can also cause some serious health problems if it’s ingested, such as upsetting hormone levels, interfering with brain function, and increasing your risk of heart disease. For these reasons, the WAT40B is completely BPA-free.

The water reservoir in the WAT40B is made from stainless steel. It not only protects against corrosion, but also to ensure the water tastes good when you drink it. Water stored in plastic containers often absorbs an unpleasant under taste, but not when they’re stored in stainless steel. It’s always pure and fresh.

Ovente KG83B Electric Tea Kettle
The Ovente KG83B Electric Tea Kettle is made from borosilicate glass, glass made from silia and boron troxide. These elements are heat resistant and ideal for boiling water. The kettle isn’t entirely glass, however.  Even borosilicate can crack if heated too quickly. It has a metal base, connected to the heating element, and a plastic silicon lid. The plastic is also BPA-free and the silicon ring at the top does not come into contact with the water while it’s boiling. This not only ensures that there’s no contamination, but that the water doesn’t taste like plastic (through a few customers have reported that the heat from the steam warps the lid). The cord folds up into the base, so it won’t get in your way while you’re pouring.

Proctor Silex K2070yA Electric Kettle
The Proctor Silex K2070yA Electric Kettle is made from plastic. It’s all BPA-free, so there are no health risks, but since the water is in direct contact with the plastic while it’s being heated, there is a chance it will pick up a plastic taste (some customers have complained about the taste). The water is also in direct contact with the heating element at the bottom of the pot, which is different from NewAir and Ovente, where the heating element heats the water from the outside. Though it has to be plugged into the wall, the cord detaches, so it’s easy to pour.

Safety Features

Hot Water Dispenser vs. Electric Kettle

NewAir WAT40B Hot & Cold Water Dispenser
The main safety feature on the NewAir WAT40B Hot & Cold Water Dispenser is the safety lock on the hot water faucet. It’s a common feature on most hot water dispensers and is designed to prevent children from accidentally dispensing hot water and scalding themselves, a common danger in countries like China, where locks aren’t required on hot water dispensers. The lock is simple to use. Press down on the red button above the nozzle, then press down on the tab.

The WAT40B also has a shut off switch for the hot water reservoir, sometimes found on other dispensers, which can be used to shut down the heating element if you’re worried it may overload your home’s electrical system. There’s no risk of mold or bacterial contamination either. The hot water in the reservoir actually kills off bacteria and mold and prevents it from growing.

Ovente KG83B Electric Tea Kettle
To prevent burns, the Ovente KG83B Electric Tea Kettle has a stay-cool handle and a non-slip base that reduces the risk of spills. There is also an automatic shutoff function, which turns the unit off once the water starts boiling. To protect the unit from heat damage, it also has dry boil protection, which cuts power to the heating element if the water boils away. Despite these precautions, there have still been some complaints. A few customers have said steam collects around the power button, which makes it hot and hard to shut off, and that the unit gives off a strong, burning smell after a few weeks of use.

Proctor Silex K2070yA Electric Kettle
Like Ovente, the Proctor Silex K2070yA Electric Kettle also comes with an automatic shut off and dry boil protection. Proctor Silex runs its kettles through 10,000 boiling before they’re approved for sale. However, some customers have warned that the sides of the kettle are hot-to-the-touch while the water is boiling.

The Bottom Line

Electric kettles are a good way to boil water very quickly. However, if you’re looking for a way to enjoy hot water safely, without waiting, then a hot water dispenser like the NewAir WAT40B is what you want. They monitor the temperature in the water reservoir, making sure the water is always piping hot, and they’re safer and more reliable than an electric kettle. Stainless steel tanks means there’s no plastic under taste and the BPA-free plastic and hot water safety lock protects against accidents. For all their virtues, an electric kettle can’t deliver that kind of reliable performance.

Hot Water Dispenser vs. Electric Kettle

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