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7/31/2014 5:34:24 PMANW004buyboxdiscountGet up to 15% OFF MOST ORDERS TODAY Use Code Deal at checkoutcserebatediscountbannerv2discountbannerv2secuhomepagemainhours Mon-Fri: 7 AM - 5 PM PSTlogomobilebannermobilebannersecurepopcouponseoblurbEnjoy Perfectly Chilled Wine with a Wine Cooler Did you know that 20 million acres of land is planted to grapes worldwide? For centuries wine has been one of the most popular beverages made. People have been enjoying wine since ancient times, and it's widely consumed today. Enjoyed in moderation it's even known to have health benefits. According to Joy Bauer of NBC's Today Health "the alcohol content and non-alcoholic phytochemicals in wine has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, certain cancers, and slow the progression of neurological degenerative disorders like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease." So if you love wine - maybe you're a wine connoisseur or a new collector - then consider a wine cooler to store your collection in. Wine coolers come in a variety of shapes and sizes and they're perfect for both red and white wines. Single ZoneSingle zone wine coolers are best for storing a single type of wine - either your favorite reds or whites. Most models include an adjustable thermostat so you can keep your collection chilled at an ideal temperature. Some are compact, holding between 12 and 21 bottles of wine at a time. This type fits in small spaces easily, making them perfect for apartment living or a home bar. Some are slightly bigger and include storage for stemware and other wine accessories. Dual ZoneThese wine coolers store both red and white wine at separate temperatures. An adjustable thermostat allows you to set the temperature for each zone just as you like. White wine must be kept slightly cooler than red wine. The optimal temperature for a red wine beverage is 50-55 degrees F. White wines should be kept at a temperature of about 45 degrees F. This type of cooler allows you to store a variety of flavors at an optimal temperature for the best possible results.Choosing to store your wine in a wine fridge is a great idea. Too often some of the best wine collections are damaged because of instability in temperature and moisture. A wine cooler provides balance and stability thus maintaining excellent flavor and proper aging.A Few Wine Facts - Just for Fun!The smell of young wine is called "aroma" and the smell of a more mature wine is called a "bouquet"Women tend to be better wine tasters than men because women have a stronger sense of smellRed wines are red because fermentation extracts color from the grape skinsWine testers swirl their glass to encourage the wine to release all aromasOne ton of grapes makes about 60 cases of wine - about 720 bottles, and one bottle of wine contains 2.8 lbs. of grapesRed wine represents 55% of restaurant wine salesA "cork-tease" is someone that constantly talks about opening a bottle of wine but never doesThe world's oldest bottle of wine dates back to A.D. 325trust50282635Contentdry-ice.htmPage-Content-WBP-dry-ice.htm99273/dry-ice.htm26FreeAnswerUrl/dry-ice.htm1System27FreeAnswerBrowser TitleThe History and Uses of Dry Ice1Page28WysiwygContent<div align="center"><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="700"><tbody><tr><td><h1>The History and Uses of Dry Ice</h1><table style="width: 200px" border="0" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="0" align="right"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"><img src="http://cache.air-n-water.com/art/dryice2a.jpg" alt="dryice2" align="right"/></td></tr></tbody></table><p>What can produce fog at a Halloween party, keep foods and beverages cold during transport, assist in science experiments, and even preserve body parts for medical purposes? The answer, of course, is dry ice. This important product serves a variety of purposes today, and those who know all about it can use it safely and beneficially. Want to learn more about dry ice and what it does? Read this brief, helpful guide to become acquainted with all that dry ice is and has to offer.</p><p><strong>Q: What is dry ice?</strong></p><p>A: Dry ice is simply the frozen form of the common element known as carbon dioxide, which human beings exhale during respiration and which is essential to the health of plants all around the world. Dry ice is very cold, with an average temperature of minus 109.3 degrees Fahrenheit. Moreover, it is an unusual solid because it changes directly to a gas and not a liquid during a "melting" process known as sublimation.</p><p><strong>Q: Who first observed dry ice and when?</strong></p><p>A: Most historians agree that the French chemist named Charles Thilorier was the very first person to observe dry ice. In 1835 he was gazing into a metal cylinder that contained a great volume of liquid carbon dioxide in order to watch it evaporate. After the evaporation, there was a block of dry ice at the bottom of the cylinder. Prest Air Devices, which later became DryIce Corporation of America, was the first company to use dry ice commercially in the United States when in 1925 they built a factory to sell dry ice to railroads for cooling train cars.</p><p><strong>Q: How is dry ice manufactured?</strong></p><p>A: Today, dry ice is manufactured by releasing pressurized liquid carbon dioxide into expansion chambers. As this release occurs, the liquid carbon dioxide turns to gas and the temperature drops. About half of the liquid carbon dioxide becomes flakes of "dry ice snow," which are then pressed together in order to form blocks of dry ice. Dry ice is manufactured by a variety of companies and laboratories all around the country.</p><p><strong>Q: What is it used for?</strong></p><p>A: Dry ice is used for a variety of commercial, scientific, and entertainment applications. It can be placed into hot water to simulate fog during Halloween and on other occasions. Dry ice is also useful for science experiments and projects. It is also commonly used to transport frozen foods and even organs for medical transplants.</p><p><strong>Q: Is dry ice hazardous?</strong></p><p>A: The temperature of dry ice makes it a potential cause of frostbite when it is handled carelessly, so it is important always to wear protective gloves when handling a block of dry ice. There is also the danger of suffocation when it is allowed to sublimate in a closed, confined space, so dry ice should always be used in a well-ventilated area. Even so, food grade dry ice can be used to cool punch and other beverages, although the chunks of dry ice themselves must never be consumed by the drinkers.</p><p><strong>Q: Where can I find more information on dry ice and its uses?</strong></p><p>A: The Internet is a great resource for facts on dry ice. The following are some of the top sites online with more&nbsp; information about dry ice, its history, and its uses.</p><p><a href="http://www.coolscience.org/CoolScience/KidScientists/DryIce.htm" rel="nofollow">Cool Science: Dry Ice</a>&nbsp;- Here are some fun experiments that can be performed using dry ice.</p><p><a href="http://www.phys.ufl.edu/courses/phy4550-6555c/spring08/lecture080115.pdf" rel="nofollow">Cryogenic Milestones of Civilization</a>&nbsp;- Included in this set of slides is a brief account of Charles Thilorier's discovery of dry ice.</p><p><a href="http://faculty.rcoe.appstate.edu/goodmanjm/hwr/science/dry_ice/dry_ice.html" rel="nofollow">Dry Ice</a>&nbsp;- Some good information on dry ice as well as a video can be found on this page.</p><p><a href="http://www.dryiceinfo.com/" rel="nofollow">Dry Ice Info</a>&nbsp;- This site, which is sponsored by manufacturers of dry ice, is a comprehensive guide to the history, composition, and applications of dry ice.</p><p><a href="http://www.ecu.edu/cs-admin/oehs/ih/Dry-Ice.cfm">Dry Ice Safety</a>&nbsp;- East Carolina University provides this resource on safely using and storing dry ice.</p><p><a href="http://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/73147/title/Dry_ice,_wetter_Mars" rel="nofollow">Dry Ice, Wetter Mars</a>&nbsp;- <em>Science News</em> explains what a recent discovery of dry ice on Mars tells us about its climate.</p><p><a href="http://www.practicalphysics.org/go/Guidance_24.html" rel="nofollow">Making Dry Ice</a>&nbsp;- This is a PracticalPhysics.org article on making dry ice.</p><p><a href="http://van.physics.illinois.edu/qa/listing.php?id=1679" rel="nofollow">Melting Dry Ice</a>&nbsp;- This page is a helpful overview on how dry ice melts and whether or not it can be used in beverages.</p><p><a href="http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/vef/kids/dryice.php">NWSFO: Dry Ice Safety</a>&nbsp;- An extensive guide to dry ice safety, especially for kids, is found here.</p><p><a href="http://newyorkhealth.gov/environmental/indoors/food_safety/dry_ice.htm" rel="nofollow">What is Dry Ice</a>&nbsp;- The New York State Department of Health has this good resource on dry ice.</p><p>&nbsp; </p></td></tr></tbody></table></div>1Page2729WysiwygFooter<div align="center"><table border="0" width="700"><tbody><tr><td><h2>Recommended Pages: </h2></td></td /></tr><tr><td><table border="1" cellspacing="0" width="700" cellpading="0"><tbody><tr><td><table><tbody></tbody></table><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="700" align="center"><tbody><tr><th>Window Fans </th><th>Evaporative Coolers</th><th>Ice Makers</th></tr><tr><td><ul><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/evaporative-cooler.htm">Portable air coolers</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/wine-cellar.htm">Wine coolers </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/water-dispensers.htm">Home water dispenser </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/fan_ceiling.html">Ceiling fan</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/portable-air-conditioners.htm">Portable air conditioning unit</a> </li></ul></td><td><ul><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/portable-air-conditioners.htm">Portable air conditioner reviews</a></a /> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/best-pedestal-fans.htm">Best pedestal fan</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/freestanding-wine-coolers.htm">Freestanding wine cellar </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/dual-zone-wine-coolers.htm">Dual zone wine cooler </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/ice-maker.htm">Ice maker</a> </li></ul></td><td><ul><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/napoleon-bbq-grills.htm">Napoleon BBQ grills </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/portable-air-conditioners.htm">Portable air conditioners</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/wine-cellar.htm">Wine cellars </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/best-bbq-grills.htm">BBQ grill reviews </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/fan_window.html">Window fan</a> </li></ul></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td /></tr /></table /></div>1Page29MultiChoiceDropDownTemplate1171System1449MultiChoiceDropDownSidebar741System281FreeAnswerMeta Keywordsdry ice, dry ice uses, history of dry ice, dryice1Page282FreeAnswerMeta DescriptionDry is used in science experiences, parties and can even keep food cold. Learn more about dry ice and what it has to offer here.1Page100023dryice2Image-dry-ice.htm-dryice2030/art/dryice2a.jpg/art/dryice2a-s.jpg/art/dryice2a-l.jpg/art/dryice2a-m.jpg/art/dryice2a.jpg/art/dryice2a-c.jpg

The History and Uses of Dry Ice

dryice2

What can produce fog at a Halloween party, keep foods and beverages cold during transport, assist in science experiments, and even preserve body parts for medical purposes? The answer, of course, is dry ice. This important product serves a variety of purposes today, and those who know all about it can use it safely and beneficially. Want to learn more about dry ice and what it does? Read this brief, helpful guide to become acquainted with all that dry ice is and has to offer.

Q: What is dry ice?

A: Dry ice is simply the frozen form of the common element known as carbon dioxide, which human beings exhale during respiration and which is essential to the health of plants all around the world. Dry ice is very cold, with an average temperature of minus 109.3 degrees Fahrenheit. Moreover, it is an unusual solid because it changes directly to a gas and not a liquid during a "melting" process known as sublimation.

Q: Who first observed dry ice and when?

A: Most historians agree that the French chemist named Charles Thilorier was the very first person to observe dry ice. In 1835 he was gazing into a metal cylinder that contained a great volume of liquid carbon dioxide in order to watch it evaporate. After the evaporation, there was a block of dry ice at the bottom of the cylinder. Prest Air Devices, which later became DryIce Corporation of America, was the first company to use dry ice commercially in the United States when in 1925 they built a factory to sell dry ice to railroads for cooling train cars.

Q: How is dry ice manufactured?

A: Today, dry ice is manufactured by releasing pressurized liquid carbon dioxide into expansion chambers. As this release occurs, the liquid carbon dioxide turns to gas and the temperature drops. About half of the liquid carbon dioxide becomes flakes of "dry ice snow," which are then pressed together in order to form blocks of dry ice. Dry ice is manufactured by a variety of companies and laboratories all around the country.

Q: What is it used for?

A: Dry ice is used for a variety of commercial, scientific, and entertainment applications. It can be placed into hot water to simulate fog during Halloween and on other occasions. Dry ice is also useful for science experiments and projects. It is also commonly used to transport frozen foods and even organs for medical transplants.

Q: Is dry ice hazardous?

A: The temperature of dry ice makes it a potential cause of frostbite when it is handled carelessly, so it is important always to wear protective gloves when handling a block of dry ice. There is also the danger of suffocation when it is allowed to sublimate in a closed, confined space, so dry ice should always be used in a well-ventilated area. Even so, food grade dry ice can be used to cool punch and other beverages, although the chunks of dry ice themselves must never be consumed by the drinkers.

Q: Where can I find more information on dry ice and its uses?

A: The Internet is a great resource for facts on dry ice. The following are some of the top sites online with more  information about dry ice, its history, and its uses.

Cool Science: Dry Ice - Here are some fun experiments that can be performed using dry ice.

Cryogenic Milestones of Civilization - Included in this set of slides is a brief account of Charles Thilorier's discovery of dry ice.

Dry Ice - Some good information on dry ice as well as a video can be found on this page.

Dry Ice Info - This site, which is sponsored by manufacturers of dry ice, is a comprehensive guide to the history, composition, and applications of dry ice.

Dry Ice Safety - East Carolina University provides this resource on safely using and storing dry ice.

Dry Ice, Wetter Mars - Science News explains what a recent discovery of dry ice on Mars tells us about its climate.

Making Dry Ice - This is a PracticalPhysics.org article on making dry ice.

Melting Dry Ice - This page is a helpful overview on how dry ice melts and whether or not it can be used in beverages.

NWSFO: Dry Ice Safety - An extensive guide to dry ice safety, especially for kids, is found here.

What is Dry Ice - The New York State Department of Health has this good resource on dry ice.

 

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