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8/1/2014 9:48:19 AMANW002buyboxdiscountGet up to 10% OFF MOST ORDERS TODAY Use Code Happy at checkoutcserebatediscountbannerv2discountbannerv2secuhomepagemainhours Mon-Fri: 7 AM - 5 PM PSTlogomobilebannermobilebannersecurepopcouponseoblurbThe 8 Best Places To Use Your Portable Air ConditionerThe GarageGarages and workshops can be difficult areas to cool, especially since these spaces are not typically insulated. This causes the air to warm very quickly. But if you plan to spend a lot of time in your garage, then you're going to need a cooling option. Since an electric fan would simply circulate the warm air, they typically won't be able to lower the air temperature enough to make a difference. A portable air conditioner, however, can lower the temperature substantially without taking up much more space than a fan would. It's important to buy a portable air conditioner with a little more power because of the lack of insulation.The BedroomAs sleeping is such a important part of our lives, complete comfort is absolutely essential for your bedroom. While some standard air conditioning units can be loud and obnoxious while running, many portable air conditioners can run much quieter. In particular, Sharp has a line specifically designed to run quietly. Their patented "Library Quiet" technology ensures that the portable AC will not keep you up at night or force you to choose between comfort and noise ever again.Your Basement Basements typically are cooler than other areas of your home, but still suffer from warm, humid air over the summer months. Since basements typically do not have the window space available that a window air conditioner would require, nor the access to most central air systems, a portable air conditioner is a great alternative. Additionally, most portable air conditioners can also help to dehumidify the air, which only adds to their usability in the basement. Portable AC units are also small and mobile, so they'll fit almost anywhere in your basement.The OfficeIt's difficult to get anything done when you're hot and uncomfortable at work. Whether you're looking to cool your entire business or just your small corner office, a portable air conditioner will have you covered. Due to their mobility, portable air conditioners are great for office use, since you can move it from room to room to spot cool the areas that need it most. They're also compact enough to fit in any corner and can run quietly, ensuring they don't disturb anyone else in the office.Your Dorm RoomDorm rooms can get pretty hot, especially with all these electronics humming away. Unfortunately, many dorms do not have central air, and a window unit is either not allowed or just not feasible given your available space. Luckily, a portable air conditioner is smaller and doesn't require permanent installation. Venting is also simple and does not require as much space as a window unit. Above all, portable air conditioners are easy to move from room to room so it can go wherever the party is.The Living Room Once again, due to their size, cooling power and lack of installation requirements, portable air conditioners are perfect for the living room in your home. In addition to cooling the room, many different portable ACs can also act as an air purifier, which will help keep the air in your living room clean and free from dust and bacteria. Not only is it a great fit for your home, but a portable air conditioner can save you space and money you'd otherwise spend on other home appliances. A Server Room Server rooms can get very hot, thanks in part to the large number of computer parts working within a confined space. The heat generated from all the equipment can often raise the temperature of the room well beyond the recommended limits for the computer servers, which can lead to critical hardware and data problems. Not to mention that computer equipment ages quicker when hot. Some portable air conditioners are specially designed to work in server rooms, and also have the ability to act as a dehumidifier, which can further help keep your computer equipment safe.Your Studio Apartment Some might say that portable air conditioners were designed with studio apartments in mind. Thanks to their size and the lack of installation required, these cooling units are perfect for apartment living. These units are especially useful in buildings where window units are not allowed, or when there's simply not enough available space for one. If you have a studio, typically your space is at a premium, so the compact size of a portable AC is perfect for your climate control needs.trust803522726ContentWBP-Chemistry-FunPage-Content-WBP-Chemistry-Fun165719/articles-oil-water-chemistry-experiemnts.htm26FreeAnswerUrl/articles-oil-water-chemistry-experiemnts.htm1System27FreeAnswerBrowser TitleOil, Water and Chemistry - Fun Science Experiments for Your Students1Page28WysiwygContent<table style="width: 700px" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="center"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"><h1>Oil, Water and Chemistry: Fun Science Experiments for Your Students</h1><p><b><br /></b></p><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="left"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"><img src="http://cache.air-n-water.com/images/kid-approved-science.jpg" alt="Kid Approved"/></td></tr></tbody></table><p>Although we might interact with oil just about everyday when we cook, did you know that it actually has many different properties? In fact, depending on what you mix it with, it can also react in various ways. One of the most fun ways to discover the properties of oil is by carrying out some science experiments. These experiments are safe to do, but make sure that you wear gloves and protective clothing in case of any spills! When you're done, don't forget to clean up.</p><p><b>Oil and Vinegar</b></p><p>The first experiment we'll start with is by mixing oil with vinegar. Get a glass or a transparent bowl and pour in some oil. When adding vinegar, it's best to try with balsamic vinegar, which is already quite dark. You'll see that the oil stays at the top and the vinegar sinks to the bottom. This is because the oil and vinegar particles are unable to stick together. We call this <em>immiscible. </em>The vinegar is heavier than oil, so it sinks down. You can temporarily force them to mix by stirring them with a fork, but after a little while, you'll see that they separate back again.</p><ul><li><a href="http://boyslife.org/hobbies-projects/funstuff/2184/weird-science/" rel="nofollow">The Swimming Spaghetti Experiment</a></li></ul><p><b>Emulsion</b></p><p>Now that we know what happens when oil is added to vinegar, let's think about how to make them combine permanently. We need to add a third ingredient. By mixing an egg yolk with some vinegar and then adding it to our previous oil and vinegar mixture, we find that everything is properly mixed without separating! The main reason is because the egg yolk provides a chemical called <em>lecithin</em> and it forms a chemical reaction called an <em>emulsion</em>. The fat molecules in the oil hang in the mixture of egg yolk and vinegar. When you mix it up, the fat molecules stick together. If you use the right amounts of these ingredients, you can create your very own mayonnaise!</p><ul><li><a href="http://tlc.howstuffworks.com/family/science-projects-for-kids-chemical-reactions11.htm" rel="nofollow">The Emulsion Experiment</a></li><li><a href="http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/FoodSci_p021.shtml" rel="nofollow">How to Combine Oil and Vinegar Successfully</a></li><li><a href="http://www.education.com/science-fair/article/like-oil-and-vinegar/" rel="nofollow">Experimenting With Emulsifiers</a></li><li><a href="http://mypages.iit.edu/~smile/ch9509.html" rel="nofollow">How to Make Mayonnaise</a></li><li><a href="http://www.kidspace.com/index.php/2010/experiments/make-your-own-butter-2/" rel="nofollow">Use Emulsion to Make Butter</a></li></ul><p><b>Freezing Oil and Water</b></p><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="right"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"><img src="http://cache.air-n-water.com/images/water-image-m.jpg" alt="air and water Image"/></td></tr></tbody></table><p>Let's make a new mixture now. This time we'll combine some oil and water together. At room temperature, the oil will float to the top of the water. This is because oil molecules are actually much lighter than water molecules. It's a bit like comparing a balloon and a brick. If you drop both of them into a room, the balloon will float up, while the brick falls down. This concept is known as <em>density</em>. However, the density of the water and oil is different if the temperature changes. Try putting your container of oil and water in the fridge. If you check back after a couple of hours, it will be reversed! The oil would have sunk to the bottom and the water would have risen to the top.</p><ul><li><a href="http://pbskids.org/zoom/activities/sci/colorsplash.html" rel="nofollow">Mixing Oil and Food Color</a></li><li><a href="http://www.elmhurst.edu/~chm/vchembook/120Adensity.html" rel="nofollow">Learn About Density</a></li><li><a href="http://sciencesquad.questacon.edu.au/activities/oil_water.html" rel="nofollow">Water and Oil Molecule Enemies</a></li><li><a href="http://www.kidspace.com/index.php/2010/experiments/the-bubbling-cauldron/" rel="nofollow">What Happens When Water and Oil are Heated?</a></li><li><a href="http://kidscorner.org/html/science2.php#lava" rel="nofollow">Make Your Own Lava Lamp!</a></li><li><a href="http://www.biologylessons.sdsu.edu/ta/classes/lab1/TG.html" rel="nofollow">See How Water Reacts with Oil</a></li><li><a href="http://www.activitytv.com/115-double-density" rel="nofollow">Watch a Video on Double Density</a></li><li><a href="http://www.education.com/reference/article/physical-science-learning-center/?page=2" rel="nofollow">Density and Fluidity Experiments</a></li><li><a href="http://www.scifun.org/homeexpts/layeredliquids.htm" rel="nofollow">Find Out How to Layer Liquids</a></li><li><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/science/surfingscientist/pdf/lesson_plan17.pdf" rel="nofollow">An In-Depth Guide on How to Make a Lava Lamp</a> (PDF)</li></ul><p><b>Soap and Oil</b></p><p>As far as we've seen, oil molecules love to be separate from other substances. However, when you add soap to oil, it acts as an <em>emulsifier.</em> Think about when your hands are greasy and you use soap to wash them. The soap helps the grease molecules on your hands mix with water molecules. If you try washing off grease using only water, it will stay immiscible. In other words, the oil and water molecules won't mix, so your hands will remain greasy. Another way to explain this is that the soap reduces the <em>surface tension</em> of the oil. It makes the oil molecules spread far apart instead of clinging together. This is a type of chemical reaction caused by mixing different substances together. Oil can sometimes be quite tricky to clean up properly. Think about when we accidentally have huge oil spills in the ocean. We could simply add soap to clean up the oil, but that would endanger the fish and other ocean creatures. Can you think of other ways to remove the oil?</p><ul><li><a href="http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/14/g35/dawnducks.html" rel="nofollow">A Practical Use of Cleaning Oil</a></li><li><a href="http://www.amsa.gov.au/marine_environment_protection/Educational_resources_and_information/Teachers/Classroom_Projects/Clean_up_oil_spill_exercise.asp" rel="nofollow">How Do We Clean Oil in the Ocean?</a></li><li><a href="http://www.scienceinthebox.com/en_UK/main/HTML/Experiment-Sites_Green/HTML/experiment_menu.html" rel="nofollow">Experiments with Soap, Oil and Water</a></li><li><a href="http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/lesson-plan/magic-school-bus-meets-molly-cule" rel="nofollow">Investigate the Properties of Soap and Oil</a></li><li><a href="http://www.sdnhm.org/exhibits/epidemic/justforkids/experiment/index.html" rel="nofollow">A Messy Experiment with Oil and Soap!</a></li><li><a href="http://wn.com/milk,_food_coloring_and_dawn_soap_experiment" rel="nofollow">What Happens When You Mix Soap, Oil and Water?</a></li></ul></td></tr></tbody></table>1Page2729WysiwygFooter<div align="center"><table border="0" width="700"><tbody><tr><td><h2>Recommended Pages: </h2></td></td /></tr><tr><td><table border="1" cellspacing="0" width="700" cellpading="0"><tbody><tr><td><table><tbody></tbody></table><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="700" align="center"><tbody><tr><th>Ice Makers </th><th>Air Conditioners </th><th>BBQ Grills </th><th>Wine Coolers </th></tr><tr><td><ul><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/ice-cream-makers.htm">Commercial soft serve ice cream machine </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/product/ai-100s.htm">Newair ice maker </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/built-in-ice-makers.htm">Residential ice maker </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/portable-ice-makers.htm">Ice maker water line </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/portable-air-conditioners.htm">Air conditioner portable</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/compact-freezers.htm">Freezer with ice maker </a></li></ul></td><td><ul><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/compact-ice-makers-info.htm">Compact ice maker </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/swamp-coolers-evaporative.htm">Evaporative cooler </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/manual-espresso-machines.htm">Manual espresso machines </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/product/ac-12000e.htm">Newair ac-12000e </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/bagless-vacuum-cleaners.htm">Bagless vacuum cleaners </a></li></ul></td><td><ul><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/product/ac-14100e.htm">14000 btu portable air conditioner</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/product/ka44.htm">KA44 </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/smoker-grills.htm">Food smoker</a> </li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/">Air conditioning fan </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/best-patio-heaters.htm">Best patio heater </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/patio-furniture-tables.htm">Patio tables</a> </li></ul></td><td><ul><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/dehumidifiers.htm">Dehumidifiers for basements </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/fan_window.html">Fan window </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/soleus-fans.htm">Soleus fan </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/fan_blowers.html">High velocity fan </a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/room-dehumidifiers.htm">Small dehumidifier</a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/box-fans.htm">Box fans</a></li><li><a href="http://www.air-n-water.com/portable-air-conditioners.htm">Portable air conditioner units</a> </li></ul></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></td /></tr /></table /></div>1Page29MultiChoiceDropDownTemplate1171System1449MultiChoiceDropDownSidebar-11System281FreeAnswerMeta Keywordsscience experiment, kids science experiments, science experiment ideas, simple science experiment, science experiment with water, science experiments with water, water science experiments for kids1Page282FreeAnswerMeta DescriptionWho knew chemisty could be this fun? Learn more about quick and easy science expriements for kids with common household items like oil and water.1Page165720air and water ImageImage-WBP-Chemistry-Fun-air-and-water-Image030/images/water-image.jpg/images/water-image-s.jpg/images/water-image-l.jpg/images/water-image-m.jpg/images/water-image.jpg/images/water-image-c.jpg165721Kid ApprovedImage-WBP-Chemistry-Fun-Kid-Approved130/images/kid-approved-science.jpg/images/kid-approved-science-s.jpg/images/kid-approved-science-l.jpg/images/kid-approved-science-m.jpg/images/kid-approved-science.jpg/images/kid-approved-science-c.jpg35Alt Text1FreeAnswer

Oil, Water and Chemistry: Fun Science Experiments for Your Students


Kid Approved

Although we might interact with oil just about everyday when we cook, did you know that it actually has many different properties? In fact, depending on what you mix it with, it can also react in various ways. One of the most fun ways to discover the properties of oil is by carrying out some science experiments. These experiments are safe to do, but make sure that you wear gloves and protective clothing in case of any spills! When you're done, don't forget to clean up.

Oil and Vinegar

The first experiment we'll start with is by mixing oil with vinegar. Get a glass or a transparent bowl and pour in some oil. When adding vinegar, it's best to try with balsamic vinegar, which is already quite dark. You'll see that the oil stays at the top and the vinegar sinks to the bottom. This is because the oil and vinegar particles are unable to stick together. We call this immiscible. The vinegar is heavier than oil, so it sinks down. You can temporarily force them to mix by stirring them with a fork, but after a little while, you'll see that they separate back again.

Emulsion

Now that we know what happens when oil is added to vinegar, let's think about how to make them combine permanently. We need to add a third ingredient. By mixing an egg yolk with some vinegar and then adding it to our previous oil and vinegar mixture, we find that everything is properly mixed without separating! The main reason is because the egg yolk provides a chemical called lecithin and it forms a chemical reaction called an emulsion. The fat molecules in the oil hang in the mixture of egg yolk and vinegar. When you mix it up, the fat molecules stick together. If you use the right amounts of these ingredients, you can create your very own mayonnaise!

Freezing Oil and Water

air and water Image

Let's make a new mixture now. This time we'll combine some oil and water together. At room temperature, the oil will float to the top of the water. This is because oil molecules are actually much lighter than water molecules. It's a bit like comparing a balloon and a brick. If you drop both of them into a room, the balloon will float up, while the brick falls down. This concept is known as density. However, the density of the water and oil is different if the temperature changes. Try putting your container of oil and water in the fridge. If you check back after a couple of hours, it will be reversed! The oil would have sunk to the bottom and the water would have risen to the top.

Soap and Oil

As far as we've seen, oil molecules love to be separate from other substances. However, when you add soap to oil, it acts as an emulsifier. Think about when your hands are greasy and you use soap to wash them. The soap helps the grease molecules on your hands mix with water molecules. If you try washing off grease using only water, it will stay immiscible. In other words, the oil and water molecules won't mix, so your hands will remain greasy. Another way to explain this is that the soap reduces the surface tension of the oil. It makes the oil molecules spread far apart instead of clinging together. This is a type of chemical reaction caused by mixing different substances together. Oil can sometimes be quite tricky to clean up properly. Think about when we accidentally have huge oil spills in the ocean. We could simply add soap to clean up the oil, but that would endanger the fish and other ocean creatures. Can you think of other ways to remove the oil?

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